Survey on embarrassing observations

Survey Reveals Which Embarrassing Observations Workers are Willing to Point Out to Their Co-Workers

CHICAGO, September 24, 2009 – Nobody likes to point out potentially embarrassing situations, but when faced with them in the office, workers are more likely to address them with their peers than with co-workers in higher or lower positions. More than 4,400 workers participated in a nationwide survey from CareerBuilder in which they were asked, given the following embarrassing situations, which of your co-workers you would tell the following:

1.Your zipper is undone
a. Same level co-worker – 67 percent
b. Lower level co-worker – 62 percent
c. Higher level co-worker – 50 percent

2. You have something in your nose
a. Same level co-worker – 51 percent
b. Lower level co-worker – 46 percent
c. Higher level co-worker – 33 percent

3. You have food in your teeth or on your face
a. Same level co-worker – 66 percent
b. Lower level co-worker – 60 percent
c. Higher level co-worker – 49 percent

4. Your hair is messy

a. Same level co-worker – 33 percent
b. Lower level co-worker – 30 percent
c. Higher level co-worker – 13 percent

5. You have a stain on your clothes
a. Same level co-worker – 51 percent
b. Lower level co-worker – 47 percent
c. Higher level co-worker – 34 percent

6. You need a breath mint
a. Same level co-worker – 33 percent
b. Lower level co-worker – 29 percent
c. Higher level co-worker – 14 percent

7. You need a shower
a. Same level co-worker – 28 percent
b. Lower level co-worker – 28 percent
c. Higher level co-worker – 11 percent

8. Your apparel is not appropriate for the office

a. Same level co-worker – 32 percent
b. Lower level co-worker – 37 percent
c. Higher level co-worker – 10 percent

Survey Methodology

This survey was conducted online within the U.S. by Harris Interactive© on behalf of CareerBuilder.com among 4,478 U.S. workers (employed full-time; not self-employed; non government); ages 18 over between May 22nd and June 10th, 2009 (percentages for some questions are based on a subset, based on their responses to certain questions). With a pure probability sample of 4,478 one could say with a 95 percent probability that the overall results have a sampling error of +/- 1.46 percentage points. Sampling error for data from sub-samples is higher and varies.